Posts tagged with: death

The unshaken faith of a protestant on her deathbed

A protestant relative of a Catholic Archbishop – The Montreal Daily Witness, Sep. 30 1875

This morning the remains of Catherine McHale, widow of the late James Comber of this city, were interred in the Mount Royal Cemetery. She was a cousin of the noted Roman Catholic Archbishop McHale, of Tuam, Ireland. She died in Quebec, and had been for 14 years a member of the Church of England there, and the Presbyterian body here. She was a native of Killala, County Mayo, and was born and brought up a good Catholic. When she married, she changed her creed, and has ever since been a steadfast adherent of the Protestant faith. It was made known to many Roman Catholics in Quebec that she was related to the Archbishop, and they manifested some anxiety over her conversion. A year ago, having been taken ill, an Irish Catholic friend sent over a priest, who administered to her the Sacrament of Extreme Unction. She recovered, but during her late illness, did not see any spiritual advisors except Protestants, who state that within a day of her death, she expressed herself thoroughly reconciled, and that she experienced the peace of God. She leaves two daughters in Canada, one residing in this city and the other in Quebec.

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Smallpox strikes down a man in Griffintown

A sad death – The Montreal Daily Post, Sep. 23 1885

A smallpox patient falls dead in Dalhousie Street

One of the saddest events which it has been our lot to chronical in connection with the smallpox epidemic, occurred early this morning in Dalhousie street. It appears that some days ago Mr. Adams, a strong and powerfully built man, residing at 177 Dalhousie Street, was stricken down with the fell disease. The neighbors got wind of the case, and avoided the house, while some of the more considerate ones laid complaints at the Health Department, the last one being made on Sunday last, but the house was neither placarded nor any attention paid to the case.

Last night, or rather in the early hours of this morning, while the storm was at its fiercest, the inhabitants in the locality were aroused by the piercing shrieks of a woman, and upon looking out saw the form of a man clad in bedclothes dashing wildly along the street. The vanishing spectre-like being proved to be Mr. Adams, who, in a state of delirium, had got control of his wife, and despite her efforts had left the house. He had, however, gone but a short distance when he sank to the sidewalk in an apparent lifeless condition.

His wife cried for help, and word was sent to the police, but they refused to meddle in the affair. Finally, a French Canadian of the neighbourhood volunteered to assist the afflicted woman, and with his aid she managed to drag the nude form of her demented husband to the doorway of her home; but alas, here they found they were unable to carry him up stairs, and they were reluctantly compelled to leave him in the doorway, where he died shortly after.

Had the police or health authorities, acted with a little more promptitude the opinion is freely expressed that a life might have been saved in this case. In conversation with several persons this morning a Post reporter was informed that the number of authenticating physicians were entirely too small for the demand.

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Can't be buried on a Sunday

Funerals – The Montreal Daily Witness Sep. 4, 1874

It is a breach of good taste which prevails here perhaps more than in other countries, to make a large display at funerals. By our customs it becomes necessary for a man who wishes to show respect to his friend, or his friends’ friend, to give half a day of his business time, in a costume different from usual, to follow his remains to the grave. It would be more edifying if arrangements were made, as a correspondent of the Witness once suggested, to enable friends to attend a service in a church or at the house, and then return to their work, leaving those who are really mourners to care for the remains which are dear to them, and to give vent to sorrow with which strangers cannot intermeddle. One evil result of this ostentation is the constant tendency to hold funerals on the Lord’s Day, giving occupation to cemetery employees and to undertakers, and what is equally objectionable, to clergymen upon that day when all should rest. The ministers of Montreal have already protested against this, and we are glad now to hear that the Cemetery Company have resolved to take decisive measures on the subject, by refusing to admit funerals on Sunday, except under extraordinary circumstances, and then only at special hours. Such action has, we believe, always been custom at Mount Hermon Cemetery, at Quebec, and we hope the reform will receive the support of the community here.

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Farmer dies after dinner

City News – The Montreal Daily Post Jun. 15, 1885

A farmer named Beaudoin arrived from the country on Saturday morning and put up at one of the hotels opposite the Bonsecours Market. After his dinner he sat down in the office and was to all appearance asleep. The clerk, having occasion to come from behind the counter, discovered the astounding fact that the man was dead. A doctor was summoned and made an examination, pronouncing the cause of death to be heart disease. Beaudoin is a resident of St. Lin, where he owns a large farm. The coroner has been notified.

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Woman dies after knocking over lamp

Burned to Death – The Montreal Daily Herald May 26, 1886

A woman named Mary Ann Dwyer, residing at 59 Colborne street, was occupied whitewashing a room in her house yesterday morning, when she overthrew a lighted lamp, which exploded and set fire to her clothing. Notwithstanding her desperate efforts and the assistance of friends, who rushed to her assistance, she was terribly burned and fell fainting to the floor. The house was set on fire but the prompt action of the men from No. 3 station soon extinguished the flames. The poor woman was removed to the General Hospital in an ambulance, being attended to by Dr. Macdonald. She expired at half-past three o’clock in the afternoon in terrible agony. The coroner will hold an inquest this morning.

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